2011 – 2012 Courses

Courses Spring 2012

Harvard Faculty of Arts and Science

General Education

Culture and Belief 12 For the Love of God and His Prophet: Religion, Literature, and the Arts in Muslim Cultures
Catalog Number: 7027
Ali S. Asani (Study of Religion; Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations) 
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12, 13
The course surveys the literary and artistic dimensions of the devotional life of the world’s Muslim communities, focusing on the role of literature and the arts (poetry, music, architecture, calligraphy, etc.) as expressions of piety and socio-political critique. An important aim of the course is to explore the relationships between religion, literature, and the arts in a variety of historical and cultural contexts in the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, Europe, and America.
Note: No prior knowledge of Islam required. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3627. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for either Culture and Belief or Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding, but not both. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engages substantially with Study of the Past. This course, when taken for a letter grade meets the Core area requirement for either Foreign Cultures or Literature and Arts C, but not both.

Culture and Belief 41 (formerly Historical Study A-67) Gender, Islam, and Nation in the Middle East and North Africa
Catalog Number: 0352
Afsaneh Najmabadi (History; Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality) 
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 12, and a weekly section to be arranged on Friday. EXAM GROUP: 5
This course will focus on how concepts of woman and gender have defined meanings of religious and national communities in the Islamic Middle East and North Africa. It will survey changes in these concepts historically through reading a variety of sources—religious texts and commentaries, literary and political writings, books of advice, women’s writings, and films—and will look at how contemporary thinkers and activists ground themselves differently in this historical heritage to constitute contesting positions regarding gender and national politics today.
Note: This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engages substantially with Study of the Past. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for either Foreign Cultures or Historical Study A, but not both.

Freshman Seminars

Freshman Seminar 48p. Islam and Revolution: From Algerian Independence to the Arab Revolution - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 83786 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Hassanaly Ladha 
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
This course interrogates the relationship between Islam, political theory, and the process of revolution in Muslim societies, examining three cases in particular: the Algerian war of 1954-1962 against French colonial rule; the Iranian revolution of 1979 and the green movement of 2009; and the Arab revolutions of 2011 beginning in Tunisia. Are these revolutions Islamic? Where revolutionary movements aim for power, how do they negotiate Islamic principles and identities on the one hand and political theory and practice on the other?
Note: Open to Freshmen only. No prior knowledge of Islam is required. Knowledge of French or Arabic is helpful but not required; all texts will be made available in English translation.

East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Uyghur B. Elementary Uyghur
Catalog Number: 5271
Mark C. Elliott 
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 8:30–10. EXAM GROUP: 10, 11
Continuation of Uyghur A. Completion of basic Uyghur grammar, listening and speaking practice with the aid of audio-visual materials, selected readings from Uyghur literature and academic prose.

Government

Government 90da. Democracy, Alienation, and Muslims in the West
Catalog Number: 71687 Enrollment: Limited to 16.
Justin Daniel Gest 
Half course (spring term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
This seminar develops an in-depth understanding of modern democratic citizenship and political identity, examining Western Muslim communities as an evocative case study. We first consider the shifting foundations of democratic participation and political alienation in a globalizing world. We then illustrate new developments by exploring the experiences of Muslim communities’ in Western democratic polities. Finally, these concepts and observations are applied to understand three contemporary socio-political phenomena – global Islam, transnational Muslim politics, and terrorist networks.

Government 90sa. Political and Social Movements in the Modern Middle East - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 84909 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Instructor to be determined 
Half course (spring term). M., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
The Middle East has witnessed significant socio-cultural, political, and economic transformations in recent decades. This seminar will explore the role of both state and non-state actors in these processes. In the face of globalization, liberalization, democratization, conflicts, and regional instability, what social movements have emerged and in what specific contexts? Additionally, how have civil society, the mass media, global discourses, and Islamist institutions and ideologies shaped the contemporary reality? What are the prospects for peace, prosperity, and pluralism in the region? These are central questions we will attempt to address in this course.

History

History 78c. Islam, Law, and the State: Historical and Global Comparisons (with Julia Stephens) - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 31805 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
David R. Armitage 5023 
Half course (spring term). M., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
This course is a historical introduction to Islamic law and Islamic political thought covering the classical period to the present. The course examines the diverse ways in which states have incorporated Islam into their legal structures from early-modern empires to post-colonial states in Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. Particular emphasis will be given to debates in the nineteenth and twentieth century about the relationship between religion, politics, and the modern nation state.
Note: Instructor: Julia Stephens

History 1045. Crusade and Jihad in the Medieval Mediterranean - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 19403
Jeffrey Robert Webb 
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
In the long history of violence in the name of religion, the medieval crusades count among the most notorious episodes. We will explore the ideologies of holy war in Christianity and Islam as we examine the sources and cultures of Latin Christendom, the Byzantine empire, and the Islamic world, their conflicts, and their larger interactions in the eleventh, twelfth, and thirteenth centuries.

History 2884. Topics in Ottoman Social and Cultural History: Seminar
Catalog Number: 3762
Cemal Kafadar 
Half course (spring term). Tu., 2–5. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17, 18
Topic to be announced.
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Turkish.

History of Art and Architecture

History of Art and Architecture 121k. Islamic Ornament and the Aesthetics of Abstraction – (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 87224 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Gülru Necipoglu-Kafadar 
Half course (spring term). W., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9
In conjunction with a Harvard conference on “Ornament” in fall 2010, critically explores interpretations of Islamic ornament. Themes include orientalism and ornamentalism, discourses on the “arabesque,” resonances of non-figural abstraction with modernism and postmodern aesthetics.

Literature and Comparative Literature

LIT-ART B-35: The Age of Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent: Art, Architecture, and Ceremonial at the Ottoman Court
Gülru Necipoglu-Kafadar
Half Course (Spring 2010). Tu, Thu 11-12, Sackler Museum 318
“Golden Age” of Ottoman-Islamic visual culture in the 16th century, considered within its ceremonial and historical contexts, focusing on architecture, miniature painting, and decorative arts. Stresses the transformation of Byzantine Constantinople into Ottoman Istanbul, formation of an imperial architectural style, and cross-cultural artistic contacts with contemporary European and Islamic courts. Considers art and architecture of Safavid Iran and Mughal India as a comparative backdrop. Discusses the role of centralized court ateliers in propagating canons of taste, the emphasis on decorative arts in a culture that rejected monumental sculpture and painting, and representations of the East by European artists in the Orientalist mode.

Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Jewish Studies 65. The Jews in Muslim and Christian Spain - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 92565
Marc Saperstein 
Half course (spring term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4
A study of the political, social, and cultural history of the Hispano-Jewish community from the seventh-century Visigothic regime and the Muslim conquest of Spain in 711 to the expulsion of the Jews from Christian Spain in 1492. Emphasis on literary and intellectual developments and on the complex relationship of the Jews to Iberian Christendom and Islam, especially during the “Golden Age” (ca. 950-1150).

Islamic Civilizations 183. Reform and Revival in Modern Islam, 19th -20th centuries - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 15829
Malika Zeghal 
Half course (spring term). W., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7
This course will shed light on the historical transformation of the internal religious reforms of Islam in the 18th and 19th century into politicized and/or fundamentalist versions of Islam in the 20th century.
Note: Offered jointly with Divinity School as HDS 3362.

Islamic Civilizations 205br. The Satanic Verses Problem in History II
Catalog Number: 9511
M. Shahab Ahmed 
Half course (spring term). M., 2–5. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8, 9
Wide-ranging introduction to the Islamic intellectual tradition through primary source readings from the debate over the Satanic verses incident conducted in the discourses of sirah-maghazitafsir, Hadith, ‘ilm al-kalamusul al-fiqh, Sufism, inter-sectarian polemic, inter-religious polemic, etc, from the 7th century to today.
Note: Not open to auditors. Course may not be taken pass-fail. Jointly offered with the Divinity School as 3597.
Prerequisite: Advanced Reading Proficiency in Arabic and Islamic Civilizations 205a

Islamic Civilizations 219. Arabic Family Law from 1984-2005 - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 20526 Enrollment: Limited to 20.
Baber Johansen (Divinity School) 
Half course (spring term). W., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
The period between 1984 and 2005 sees important changes in the family law of Arab states from Morocco to the United Arab Emirates. The course gives an overview of these changes and discusses in some detail the codes of 1984 (Kuwait, Algeria, the project of the Arab League) as swell as the major reforms in Egypt (1985, 2001; Morocco 2004, and Algeria 2005). Strategies of reform will constitute one of the main objects of this course.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3591.

Islamic Civilizations 233. Islamic Modernism III: 1970-2011 - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 65847 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Baber Johansen (Divinity School) 
Half course (spring term). M., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
The seminar will discuss three developments; a.) The growing identification of Islam with political institutions and political modes of action (the Iranian revolution of 1979; the political doctrines of the Muslim Brethren from 1954 to 2011; Al-Qa’ida and terror in the name of Islam); b.) the identification of Islam with legislative principles of constitutional ranking (in many of the Arab constitutions since the 1970s); c.) the formation of a hermeneutics that critically reflects on the politicization of Islam.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3965.

Arabic

Arabic Bb (formerly Arabic 120b and 121b). Intermediate Arabic II
Catalog Number: 0973
William E. Granara and staff 
Half course (spring term). M., through F., at 10, 11, or 12. EXAM GROUP: 3, 12
A continuation of Arabic Ba.
Note: Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4361.
Prerequisite: Arabic A or equivalent.

Arabic 130b. Upper-Level Classical Arabic II
Catalog Number: 2964
William E. Granara 
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10, and additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12
Continuation of Arabic 130a or may be taken separately with permission of the instructor. Readings from corpus of “Adab” (Belles-Lettres) literature, as well as various pieces of classical Arabic poetry.
Note: Not open to auditors. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4354.
Prerequisite: Arabic 130a or equivalent, or may be taken separately with permission of the instructor.

Arabic 131b. Upper-Level Modern Arabic II
Catalog Number: 0697
Nevenka Korica-Sullivan 
Half course (spring term). Section l: M. through Th., at 11; Section ll: M. through Th., at 12. EXAM GROUP: 4, 13
A continuation of Arabic 131a or may be taken separately with permission of the instructor. Continued emphasis on advanced reading and speaking skills, and introduction to contemporary Arabic fiction, with emphasis on short stories and essays.
Note: Not open to auditors.
Prerequisite: Arabic 131a or equivalent.

Arabic 135. Colloquial Egyptian Arabic
Catalog Number: 4454 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Nevenka Korica-Sullivan 
Half course (spring term). M., W., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9
Introduces students to Egyptian Arabic, the most widely recognized dialect in the Arab world. The course emphasizes the development of speaking and listening skills through the reinforcement of grammar and vocabulary.
Note: Not open to auditors. Students who have completed Arabic 134 may not take this course for credit.
Prerequisite: Two years of Standard Arabic or the equivalent.

Arabic 150r. History of Classical Arabic Literature: Seminar
Catalog Number: 7759
Wolfhart P. Heinrichs 
Half course (spring term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
Overview of Classical Arabic literature, including reading and discussion of selected texts.
Note: Knowledge of Arabic advantageous but not required. An additional hour may be set aside for reading in the originals.

Arabic 160r. Readings in Arabic Historians, Geographers, and Biographers
Catalog Number: 5617
Roy Mottahedeh 
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.

Arabic 170. Introduction to the Arab World II: Politics, Religion, and Culture from World War I to Present
Catalog Number: 9471
William E. Granara and members of the Department
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 10, and an additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3

The course examines the major intellectual, political and sociocultural trends in the Arab world, from the anti-colonial struggle to self-determination. Topics include Arab nationalism, political reform, cultural production, economic development, and the emergence of the Arabian Gulf. Note: Bi-lingual sectioning will be provided for students who select to read primary sources either in Arabic or English. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3626. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Historical Study A.

Arabic 240b. Classical Arabic Philology: The Religious Disciplines
Catalog Number: 68728
Wolfhart P. Heinrichs 
Half course (spring term). Tu., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
Arabic philology, including discussion of difficult grammatical problems and readings from the religious disciplines.

Arabic 241br. Advanced Modern Arabic Bridge: Language, Literature, and Culture II
Catalog Number: 6399
Khaled Al-Masri 
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 11:30-1, and an additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 13, 14
A continuation of Arabic 241ar.
Note: Conducted in Arabic. Not open to auditors.

Arabic 246r. Andalus, Sicily, and the Maghrib in Literary and Cultural Texts: Seminar
Catalog Number: 6196
William E. Granara 
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Literary and historical texts of the Arabo-Islamic cultures of Spain (al-Andalus), Sicily, and North Africa. Examines the emergence of a “Maghribi” identity amidst cross-cultural relations with the Christian North and the Muslim East.
Prerequisite: Three years of Arabic, or permission from the instructor.

Persian

Persian A. Elementary Persian
Catalog Number: 8143
Dalia Yasharpour 
Full course (indivisible). M., W., F., at 10, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
Introduction to the grammar of modern literary and spoken Persian. Selected readings from contemporary and classical Persian literature.
Note: Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail. Cannot divide for credit.

Persian Bb (formerly Persian 120b). Intermediate Persian II
Catalog Number: 3712
Dalia Yasharpour 
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 11, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 4
Continuation of Persian Ba.
Note: Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail.

Persian 132r. Advanced Classical Persian
Catalog Number: 0814
Dalia Yasharpour 
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Introduces students to styles and genres of Classic Persian literary heritage, including a systematic review of classical grammar. Readings include historiographical, geographical and biographical texts, as well as readings from “Adab” (Belles-Lettres) literature.
Note: Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail.
Prerequisite: Persian 120b or equivalent.

Turkish

Turkish 120b. Intermediate Modern Turkish II
Catalog Number: 1394
Himmet Taskomur 
Half course (spring term). M. through F., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 3, 12
Studies in argumentative and literary prose.
Note: Not open to auditors.
Prerequisite: Turkish 120a or equivalent.

Turkish 121b. Elementary Uzbek II
Catalog Number: 7303
William E. Granara and assistant 
Half course (spring term). Four meetings per week. Hours to be arranged.
Continuation of Turkish 121a.
Note: Some knowledge of Modern Turkish or other Turkic language helpful but not required. For information on Uzbek instruction at other levels, please contact the Student Programs Officer at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, reeca@fas.harvard.edu.

Turkish 145. Readings in Ottoman Language and Culture: Early Modern Travel Literature
Catalog Number: 0095
Himmet Taskomur 
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Theme: “Early Modern Travel Literature”. The course introduces students to various genres of travel writing by focusing on selected themes, including language registers, styles of travelogues.
Prerequisite: Advance reading proficiency in Ottoman Turkish.

Turkish 150b. Advanced Ottoman Turkish
Catalog Number: 40194
Himmet Taskomur 
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Note: Not open to auditors.
Prerequisite: Turkish 140 or equivalent; one year of Arabic or Persian desirable.

Turkish 160r. History of Modern Turkey through Literature
Catalog Number: 6964
Himmet Taskomur 
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 12, and an additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 5
This course surveys the history of modern Turkey and culture through Turkish literature in translation. Main focus is on topics of cultural revolution, nationalism, identity, gender, and migration. Primary readings are translations of novels, short stories, drama and poetry.
Note: Knowledge of Turkish not required. Not open to auditors.

Religion

Religion 1816. Ismaili History and Thought
Catalog Number: 18808 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Ali S. Asani 
Half course (spring term). W., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9
A seminar surveying the development and evolution of Ismaili interpretations of Islam in various historical and cultural settings.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3939.
Prerequisite: Prior study of Islam or permission by instructor required.

Religion 1828. Islam in the West - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 82458
Malika Zeghal 
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12, 13
This course concentrates on the origins and establishment of Muslim communities in the United States and Europe, and its consequences on Muslim communities themselves as well as on religious life in the west.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3360.

Religion 1842. Religion, Gender, Identity: Readings in Arab and Muslim Autobiography: Seminar
Catalog Number: 4518 Enrollment: Limited to 25.
Leila N. Ahmed (Divinity School) 
Half course (spring term). W., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
We will read autobiographical works mainly by contemporary Arab and/or Muslim writers, paying particular attention to issues of identity, religion, and gender, and exploring how these are at play in the text and in authorial constructions of self.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3616.

Religion 2800. Sources and Methods for Research in Islamic Studies - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 81794 Enrollment: May only be taken for a letter grade. Not open to auditors.
M. Shahab Ahmed 
Half course (spring term). W., 2–5. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8, 9
A hands-on introduction to the source material necessary for research in Islamic studies.
Prerequisite: Advanced reading competence in Arabic.

South Asian Studies

Urdu 103b. Advanced Urdu-Hindi
Catalog Number: 4615
Naseem A. Hines 
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 13
Continuation of Urdu 103a.

Urdu 105r. Topics in Urdu-Hindi Literature
Catalog Number: 5963
Ali S. Asani, Richard S. Delacy, and Naseem A. Hines 
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Individual reading course. A course for students with native or near-native proficiency with readings in a variety of genres from Urdu and/or Hindi literature based on student interest.

Harvard Divinity School

HDS 2101 Transnational Gender Issues in Contemporary Islam
Azza Basarudin
Spring 2012, Mon., 12-2
This course addresses the intersection of religion, gender and feminist ideals in the lives of Muslim women across Asia, the Middle East and North Africa. Drawing on ethnographic studies from these regions and focusing on Sunni, Shi’i, and Sufi traditions, topics include human rights, political participation, nationalism, legal status, sexuality, and masculinity and femininity.

HDS 3598 Quranic Exegeses Through History: Themes, Questions, and Controversies
Ahmed Ragab
Spring 2012, Wed., 4-6
This course is a survey of Quranic text and exegeses. We will follow a thematic analysis of various Quranic exegeses, which will address various topics from the existence of God, the meaning of prophecy and the life of Muhammad and other prophets, the nature of the Quran itself, the nature of miracles, to various social and political questions; such as the place of women in the society, the meaning of justice, the political organization of Muhammad’s society and the position of non-Muslims in various readings of the Muslim sacred text. In comparing and analyzing various exegeses representing various periods in Islamic history from the Middle Ages to modernity and expressing various doctrinal, intellectual, theological and philosophical positions, we will investigate how the nature, meaning and understanding of the Muslim scripture changed through history and what effect it exerted on the epistemic and socio-cognitive formation of the Islamic society. Note: Course has additional hour to be arranged.

HDS 3616 Religion, Gender, Identity – Readings in 20th Century Arab and Muslim Autobiography: Conference
Leila Ahmed
Spring 2012, Wed., 1-4
We will read autobiographical works mainly by 20th Century Arab and/or Muslim writers, paying particular attention to issues of identity, religion and gender, and exploring how these are at play in the text and in authorial constructions of self.

HDS 3949 Islamophobia in Europe and in the US: The Challenge of Religious Pluralism
Jocelyne Cesari
Spring 2012, Mon., 2-4
European and American public discourses on Islam are a microcosm of the debate on Islam’s compatibility with the West. Because Western countries generally associate Islam with the Al-Qaida movement, the Palestinian issue, and Iran, their discussion of the religion involves a politicized approach to a multifaceted faith. The course will proceed in two ways. First, we will analyze the headscarf and niqab crises, the cartoons controversy, protests against the Park51 mosque, the “Sharia debate” and the radicalization of Muslim youth, all of which currently shape the “Islamophobia.” discourse. Second, we will analyze contemporary data surveys on the attitudes of Muslim populations in Europe and in the US concerning their religious identity and political participation. We will discuss the way these attitudes are taken into account (or not) in the current political debate. Such an approach will allow us to understand more in depth major concepts such as secularism, multiculturalism, and religious freedom that are currently undergoing major changes because of the presence of Muslims and Islam in the West.

Harvard Graduate School of Design: Aga Khan Program

History of Art and Architecture 120n. Art of the Timurids in Greater Iran and Central Asia
Catalog Number: 9252 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
David J. Roxburgh 
Half course (spring term). W., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7
Critical examination of the arts of the book, portable arts, and architecture sponsored by the Timurids (1370-1507), a dynasty founded by Timur (Tamerlane). Emphasis will also be given to primary written sources in translation.

History of Art and Architecture 222m. Architecture in the Early Modern Mediterranean World: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
Catalog Number: 20595 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Gülru Necipoglu-Kafadar and Alina A. Payne 
Half course (spring term). Th., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 17, 18
Architecture of the eastern Mediterranean basin (at Italian, Ottoman, and Mamluk courts) with emphasis on cross-cultural encounters and transmission of the Romano-Byzantine heritage, science and technology, architectural practice, ornament, urban design, military, religious and domestic architecture.

Harvard Extension School

GOVT E-1182 Muslims in the West After 9/11: Between Islamophobia and Radicalization (23617)
Jocelyne Cesari
Spring term, Tuesdays beginning Jan. 23, 7:35-9:35 pm. 
Muslims are the largest religious minority in Western Europe. From the Madrid and London bombings to the cartoons crisis, doubts have arisen regarding the ability of these newcomers to integrate into European societies. This course analyzes the religious, cultural, and political situation of Muslims in Europe and discusses their accommodation to secular Western cultures. The course relies on primary documents from Muslim religious authorities and intellectuals, such as fatwas, along with novels, surveys, and scholarly research on Muslims in different European countries. In light of recent radical acts from Muslims in the United States, it also includes a comparison with Islam in the US. (4 credits).

GOVT E-1962 Islam in World Politics (23273)
Jocelyne Cesari
Spring Term, Mondays beginning Jan. 23, 5:30-7:30
Since 9/11, no Islamic concept has raised more debates and questions than jihad, a term that is now in common use in western languages. Paradoxically, jihad is widely misunderstood, often equated with arbitrary violence, holy war, or with Al-Qaeda’s fight against the West. The purpose of this course is to describe and analyze the different meanings and theories of jihad in the Islamic tradition. We discuss the differences between holy war, just war, and jihad. We trace jihad from its origins in the Qur’an and the Sunnah, and trace its evolution. The course reviews the use of jihad in Muslim empires and contemporary state systems, and analyzes the modern concept of jihad in movements like Hamas and Hezbollah. The course also considers major thinkers and theologians who have influenced the modern use of jihad, from Ibn Taymiyah to Mawdudi and Said Qutb. We review the current use of jihad by movements like Al-Qaeda and discuss how and why its current use by radical Islamists and suicide bombers is a clear break from its definition in the classical tradition of Islam. (4 credits)

GOVT E-1977 The Politics and International Relations of Iran (23398)
Houchang E. Chehabi
Spring Term, Tues. beginning Jan. 24, 7:35-9:35pm
This course provides an in-depth understanding of the Islamic Republic of Iran’s complicated political system and its international politics. Highlights include the Islamic Revolution, the establishment of the theocracy, the seizure of the US hostages, the Iran/Iraq War, the emergence of parliamentary politics, and the quest for nuclear power. (4 credits)

RELI E-1555 Introduction to Islamic Mysticism: The Sufi Tradition (23666)
Ali Asani
Spring Term, Tues. beginning Jan. 24, 7:35-9:35pm
This course is an introductory survey of the Sufi tradition within Islam, focusing on its fundamental concepts, ritual practices, institutions, and its impact on literary and sociopolitical life in different Muslim societies. Prerequisite: an introductory course in Islam is helpful. (4 credits)

Arab E-1: Intensive Elementary Modern Standard Arabic
Paul Wulfsberg
Spring Term, 2.0 credits, Tu. Th., 7:35-9:3, Sever Hall 208
The course introduces students to Arabic sounds and the writing system, basic vocabulary, and grammatical structures up to a mid-beginner’s level. The course also focuses on developing oral-aural skills, rudimentary reading, and basic composition. Students are also exposed to cultural tidbits and discussions, with the goal of appreciating the cultural context in which the language is used. (4 credits)

Arab E-2: Intensive Elementary Modern Standard Arabic II
Feryal Hijazi
Spring Term, 2.0 credits, M. 5:30-7:30, Sever Hall 210
This course is the continuation of ARAB E-1. The course introduces students to Arabic sounds and the writing system, basic vocabulary, and grammatical structures up to mid-beginner level II. The course also focuses on developing oral-aural skills, rudimentary reading, basic composition and oral presentation. Students are also exposed to cultural tidbits and discussions, with the goal of appreciating the cultural context in which the language is used. Prerequisite: ARAB E-1, or the equivalent. (4 credits)

Courses Fall 2011

 

Harvard Faculty of Arts and Science

General Education

Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding 40. Monuments of Islamic Architecture
Catalog Number: 94499
Gülru Necipoglu-Kafadar (History of Art and Architecture) and David J. Roxburgh (History of Art and Architecture) 
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 13
An introduction to ten iconic monuments of the Islamic world from the beginning of Islam to the early modern period. The course introduces various types of building-mosques, palaces, multifunctional complexes-and city types and the factors that shaped them, artistic, patronal, socio-political, religio-cultural, and economic. Each case study is divided into two lectures. The first presents the monument or city by “walking” through it. The second is devoted to themes elicited from the example, developed in light of comparative monuments, sites, and/or written sources, and to problems of patronage, production, audience and meaning as they pertain to architectural history.
Note: Expected to be omitted in 2012–13. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engages substantially with Study of the Past. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Literature and Arts B.

Societies of the World 46 (formerly Anthropology 1621). The Anthropology of Arabia
Catalog Number: 89167
Steven C. Caton (Anthropology) 
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 9, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 11
The Arabian Peninsula in the twentieth century (Saudi Arabia, the Gulf States, Oman and Yemen) is the focus of this course. Among topics to be addressed are: tribal organization and its continuing importance; gender relations; varieties of Islam and their influence; old and new forms of urbanism. Primary reading materials are all ethnographic.
Note: No background in anthropology or Middle East studies required. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engages substantially with Study of the Past. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Foreign Cultures.

United States in the World 15 (formerly Social Analysis 66). Is the American Racial Order Being Transformed?
Catalog Number: 0916
Jennifer L. Hochschild (Government; African and African American Studies) 
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 10, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
Is a fundamental transformation occurring in the American racial order? If so, are these changes for the better or the worse? We first briefly explore the history of American racial and ethnic dynamics, then examine four transformative forces: immigration, multiracialism, genomics, and the movement of young adults into political and economic power. We then consider blockages to transformation: incarceration of young black men, wealth disparities, and treatment of Muslims and undocumented immigrants. We conclude by considering various ideal futures for race and ethnicity in the U.S.
Note: This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engages substantially with Study of the Past. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Social Analysis.

Anthropology

Societies of the World 46 (formerly Anthropology 1621). The Anthropology of Arabia
Catalog Number: 89167
Steven C. Caton (Anthropology) 
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 9, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 11
The Arabian Peninsula in the twentieth century (Saudi Arabia, the Gulf States, Oman and Yemen) is the focus of this course. Among topics to be addressed are: tribal organization and its continuing importance; gender relations; varieties of Islam and their influence; old and new forms of urbanism. Primary reading materials are all ethnographic.
Note: No background in anthropology or Middle East studies required. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engages substantially with Study of the Past. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Foreign Cultures.

East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Uyghur A. Elementary Uyghur
Catalog Number: 8767
Mark C. Elliott 
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 3
Introduction to Uyghur, the Turkic language spoken in China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region and throughout Central Asia. Course covers grammar, reading and writing (in the modified Arabic alphabet adopted in the PRC), and conversation practice.

Uyghur 300. Readings in Uyghur Language and Literature
Catalog Number: 5357
Mark C. Elliott 3329 (on leave spring term) 
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Guided readings in advanced Uyghur-language texts. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: Uyghur 120B or permission of instructor.

Government

Government 1207. Comparative Politics of the Middle East - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 69802 Enrollment: Limited to 50.
Kirk J. Beattie
Half course (fall term). M., W., 1–2:30. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7
Examines politics in the Middle East, including the political impact of Islam, the legacy of the great empires and Western imperialism, sociocultural divisions, Israeli politics, monarchies and civilian authoritarian political institutions, political economies, the role of women in politics, Islamization, democratization, regional conflict, great power interests, and recent revolutionary upheavals.

History

History 1878a. Ottoman State and Society I (1300–1550)
Catalog Number: 5471
Cemal Kafadar 
Half course (fall term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4
Surveys the emergence of the Ottoman state from a frontier principality into a world empire in its sociopolitical and cultural contexts. Topics include pre-Ottoman Anatolia; frontier society; methods of conquest; centralization of power; classical institutions of the land regime and of the central administration; urbanization; religion and literature. Relations with Byzantium, other Islamic states, and Europe are examined.
Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core requirement for Historical Study B.

History 2886. Topics in Islamic History: Seminar
Catalog Number: 3470
Roy Mottahedeh 
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
Topic to be announced.

History and Literature

History and Literature 90AH: A Clash of Civilizations? France and Islam on Both Sides of the Sahara
Catalog Number: 91491
Hassanaly Ladha
Half course (fall term). Tu., 2-4.
This course will explore the apparent “clash” of France and Islam in north and west Africa in the 20th century. Working comparatively across a range of literary, historical, legal, and other texts, films, and media, we will assess how the interaction between identifiably French and Muslim peoples on both sides of the Sahara might inform contemporary attempts to conceptualize, preserve, assimilate, harmonize, or vanquish distinct “civilizations.” All materials in translation; no knowledge of Islam required.

History of Art and Architecture

History of Art and Architecture 124e. Architecture of the Early Modern Islamic Empires : Proseminar
Catalog Number: 26493 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Gülru Necipoglu-Kafadar 
Half course (fall term). Tu., 1–3.
Between the 16th and 18th centuries, three great empires ruled the Islamic lands from the Balkans to Bengal. The Mediterranean-based Ottomans, Safavids in Iran, and Mughals in India, developed visual cultures with distinctive architectural and ornamental idioms, originating from a shared Timurid heritage. The cities, monuments, and modes of ornament created in each empire are studied from aesthetic and contextual perspectives, with respect to religious orientations, imperial ideologies, and theories of dynastic legitimacy.

Interpretive Understanding 40. Monuments of Islamic Architecture
Catalog Number: 94499
Gülru Necipoglu-Kafadar (History of Art and Architecture) and David J. Roxburgh (History of Art and Architecture) 
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 13
An introduction to ten iconic monuments of the Islamic world from the beginning of Islam to the early modern period. The course introduces various types of building-mosques, palaces, multifunctional complexes-and city types and the factors that shaped them, artistic, patronal, socio-political, religio-cultural, and economic. Each case study is divided into two lectures. The first presents the monument or city by “walking” through it. The second is devoted to themes elicited from the example, developed in light of comparative monuments, sites, and/or written sources, and to problems of patronage, production, audience and meaning as they pertain to architectural history.
Note: Expected to be omitted in 2012–13. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engages substantially with Study of the Past. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Literature and Arts B.

History of Science

History of Science 108. Bodies, Sexualities, and Medicine in the Medieval Middle East
Catalog Number: 81052
Ahmed Ragab 
Half course (fall term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4
This course will examine the ways in which medical, religious, cultural, and political discourses and practices interacted in the medieval and early modern Middle East to create and reflect multiple understandings of human bodies and sexualities. Special attention to debates on health, sexuality, and gender and racial identities.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3587. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Historical Study B.

Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Near Eastern Civilizations 100. Approaches to Middle Eastern Studies - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 12411
Susan M. Kahn 
Half course (fall term). M., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7
Interdisciplinary seminar serves as an introduction to the major disciplines constituting Middle Eastern Studies, including history, political science, anthropology, literature and Islamic Studies. Faculty affiliated with the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies serve as guest lecturers.
Note: A required course primarily for undergraduates pursuing a secondary field in modern Middle Eastern Studies.

Near Eastern Civilizations 200a. Approaches to Middle Eastern Studies: Proseminar
Catalog Number: 5918
Susan M. Kahn 
Half course (fall term). M., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7
Interdisciplinary seminar serves as an introduction to the major disciplines constituting Middle Eastern Studies, including history, political science, anthropology, literature and Islamic Studies. Faculty affiliated with Center for Middle Eastern Studies serve as guest lecturers.
Note: Required for students pursuing the AM in Middle Eastern Studies. Primarily for first-term students in the AM in Middle Eastern Studies program, although open to Graduate students in related fields.

Islamic Civilizations 103. Orientalism: Old and New Perspectives - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 13124
Malika Zeghal 
Half course (fall term). W., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7
This course will look at the texts that inspired Said’s perspective in his 1978 book “Orientalism”, in particular Foucault’s “Archeology of Knowledge” and “Discipline and Punish”, and at the debates that have ensued within many disciplines such as history, sociology and cultural studies.
Note: Offered jointly with Divinity School as HDS 3358.

Islamic Civilizations 205ar. The Satanic Verses Problem in History 
Catalog Number: 0273
M. Shahab Ahmed 
Half course (fall term). M., 2–5. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8, 9
Wide-ranging introduction to the Islamic intellectual tradition through primary source readings from the debate over the Satanic verses incident conducted in the discourses of sirah-maghazitafsir, Hadith, ‘ilm al-kalamusul al-fiqh, Sufism, inter-sectarian polemic, inter-religious polemic, etc, from the 7th century to today.
Note: Not open to auditors. Course may not be taken pass-fail. Jointly offered with the Divinity School as 3596.
Prerequisite: Advanced Reading Proficiency in Arabic.

Islamic Civilizations 210. Introduction to Islamic Law - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 56941
Baber Johansen (Divinity School) 
Half course (fall term). M., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
The course ["Introduction to Islamic Law"] introduces beginners to the history of the fiqh, a system conceived of as the legal and ethical interpretation of the revealed texts of the shari’a. It will provide a description of the institutional background of this system’s diffusion throughout the Muslim World and of the historical formation of its content and methodology. The course will focus on the methods and decisions by which change was introduced and rendered licit in the fiqh during the different periods of its development. It will, in particular, discuss the changes the system underwent from the 19th to the 21st century and try to find an answer to the question: what is Islamic Law in the 21st century?
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3621.

Islamic Civilizations 212. 12th Century Maliki usul al-fiqh Texts - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 72048
Baber Johansen (Divinity School) 
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
The debate about the functions assigned to the discipline of “the roots of the law” (usul al-fiqh) dates back to the 12th century c.e. Was this discipline meant to be the theoretical foundation of the discipline on applied legal norms? Or was it rather thought of as an Organon for all religious disciplines linking them to a general theory of knowledge? In this course, Maliki usul al-fiqh texts will be read in order to answer this question.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3581.

Islamic Civilizations 241r. Approaches to Studying Indo-Muslim Culture and South Asian Islam
Catalog Number: 7515
Ali S. Asani 
Half course (fall term). Th., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 17, 18
A seminar for graduate students focusing on current scholarship on Islamic civilization in South Asia.
Note: Open to undergraduates with a background in Islamic or South Asian studies.
Prerequisite: Introductory coursework on Islam, Religion 1820 or equivalent.

Islamic Civilizations 300. Reading and Research in Islamic Civilizations
Catalog Number: 1963
M. Shahab Ahmed 5273, Ali S. Asani 7739, Khaled El-Rouayheb 5536, William Albert Graham 4156, William E. Granara 1054, Wolfhart P. Heinrichs 4988 (on leave fall term), and Malika Zeghal 6744 (fall term only)

Arabic

Arabic A. Elementary Arabic
Catalog Number: 5773
Khaled Al-Masri and staff 
Full course (indivisible). M., through F., at 9, 10, 11, or 12. EXAM GROUP: 2, 11
Introduces students to the phonology and script of classical/modern standard Arabic and covers the basic morphology and syntax of the written language. Emphasis on the development of the four skills (reading, speaking, listening, and writing). Samples of modern (contemporary) and classical styles of writing introduced into basic syllabus, and audio-visual material from the contemporary Arabic media.
Note: Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail. Cannot divide for credit. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4345.

Arabic Ba (formerly Arabic 120a and 121a). Intermediate Arabic I
Catalog Number: 1106
William E. Granara and staff 
Half course (fall term). M. through F., at 10, 11, or 12. EXAM GROUP: 3, 12
A thorough review and continuation of literary (classic and modern) Arabic grammar with emphasis on reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension. Course materials draw from both classical and modern Arabic literature and culture.
Note: Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4351.
Prerequisite: Arabic A or equivalent.

Arabic 130a. Upper-Level Classical Arabic I
Catalog Number: 4591
William E. Granara 
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 10, and additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 12
Concentration on readings from classical Islamic texts, with emphasis on Qur’an, hadîth, sîra, and tafsîr literature; directed readings and textual analysis; review of classical Arabic morphology and syntax.
Note: Not open to auditors. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4353.
Prerequisite: Arabic Ba or equivalent, or may be taken separately with permission of the instructor.

Arabic 131a. Upper-Level Modern Arabic l
Catalog Number: 0739
Nevenka Korica-Sullivan 
Half course (fall term). Section l: M. through Th., at 11; Section ll: M. through Th., at 12. EXAM GROUP: 5, 14
Reading and discussion of selections from Arabic newspapers and journals on contemporary political, social, religious, and cultural issues in the Arab world. Emphasis on developing advanced reading and speaking skills, with some attention to writing and listening comprehension.
Note: Not open to auditors.
Prerequisite: Arabic Ba or equivalent.

Arabic 133. Upper-Level Spoken Modern Standard Arabic
Catalog Number: 4747 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Feryal Hijazi 
Half course (fall term). M., W., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 8, 9
This course emphasizes the development of advanced speaking and listening skills by exposing students to the contemporary media and academia. Some reading and writing will be required, but classes will revolve around oral presentations and directed conversations.
Note: Not open to auditors.
Prerequisite: Two years of MSA or equivalent proficiency.

Arabic 158. Modern Arabic Literature Seminar: Lebanese Civil War in Fiction
Catalog Number: 5145
William E. Granara 
Half course (fall term). W., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
Examines the roots and issues of the Lebanese Civil War (1975-90) and its enormous impact on modern Arabic fiction. The syllabus pairs realistic and romanticized representations of family, sectarian, and gender binaries against the destruction and fantasy of the urban landscape. Themes include nostalgia and memory, exile and return. Films and documentaries will also be viewed.
Note: Arabic helpful but not required. Open to both undergraduates and graduates.

Arabic 172 (formerly Arabic 175). From Rahil to Rihla: Journey & Exploration in Classical & Modern Arabic - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 81999
Maher Jarrar (American University of Beirut) 
Half course (fall term). Tu., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
This course examines travel and exploration as literary topoi in Arabic poetry from religious aesthetic and political perspectives. Themes include continuities and ruptures in the Arabic poetic tradition from Jahiliyya to contemporary free-verse poetry.
Prerequisite: Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

Arabic 241ar. Advanced Modern Arabic Bridge: Language, Literature, and Culture I
Catalog Number: 3309
Khaled Al-Masri 
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 11:30-1, and an additional hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 13, 14
This constitutes the final year of Modern Arabic track. Representative readings from contemporary literature and culture will form bases of discussions on major themes in contemporary Arab society.
Note: Conducted in Arabic. Not open to auditors.
Prerequisite: Advanced proficiency in Arabic.

Arabic 245r. Classical Arabic Literature: Seminar
Catalog Number: 4854
Maher Jarrar (American University of Beirut) 
Half course (fall term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
A survey of belle-lettres, from the early proponents of the ’adab’ movement to selected tales from Arabian Nights. Texts include manuals for kings and professionals, etiquette, and amorous, liaisions. Authors included: Ibn Hazm, Al-Jahiz, and al-Tawhidi, etc.
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Arabic.

Persian

Persian A. Elementary Persian
Catalog Number: 8143
Dalia Yasharpour 
Full course (indivisible). M., W., F., at 10, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 3
Introduction to the grammar of modern literary and spoken Persian. Selected readings from contemporary and classical Persian literature.
Note: Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail. Cannot divide for credit.

Persian Ba (formerly Persian 120a). Intermediate Persian I
Catalog Number: 2206
Dalia Yasharpour 
Half course (fall term). M., W., F., at 11, and two additional hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 4
Readings in modern prose literature. Introduction to classical metrics and prosody. Readings in classical prose and poetry.

Persian 151. Sufi traditions in Persian Literature
Catalog Number: 58728
Chad Kia 
Half course (fall term). M., W., 2–3:30.
Readings in classical Persian literature from Rudaki and Attar to Rumi and Hafez, with emphasis on fundamental themes of the Sufi tradition. Practice in grammar and composition at an advanced level will develop the student’s ability to read high literary texts, both in prose and poetry.
Prerequisite: At least two years of Persian or equivalent.

Persian 152. Literary and Visual Narrative in the Persian Epic Tradition - (New Course) 
Catalog Number: 67634
Chad Kia 
Half course (fall term). Tu., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16

Turkish

Turkish 120a. Intermediate Modern Turkish I
Catalog Number: 4009
Himmet Taskomur 
Half course (fall term). M. through F., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 3, 12
Emphasis on complex sentence structure and building communicative competence in describing events and expressing ideas through exercises in reading, writing, and speaking.
Note: Not open to auditors.
Prerequisite: Turkish A or equivalent.

Turkish 121a. Elementary Uzbek 
Catalog Number: 3006
William E. Granara and assistant 
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged; four meetings per week.
Introduction to conversational and literary Uzbek. Overview of the grammar, intensive practice of the spoken language, and reading of contemporary texts.
Note: Some knowledge of Modern Turkish or other Turkic language helpful but not required. For information on Uzbek instruction at other levels, please contact the Student Programs Officer at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, reeca@fas.harvard.edu

Religion

Religion 1802 (formerly Religion 1555). Introduction to Islamic Mysticism: The Sufi Tradition
Catalog Number: 3830
Ali S. Asani 
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 12. EXAM GROUP: 14
Introductory survey of Sufism, focusing on its fundamental concepts, ritual practices, institutions, and its impact on literary and sociopolitical life in different Muslim societies.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3620.
Prerequisite: An introductory course in Islam or equivalent helpful but not essential.

Religion 1806. The Vocabulary of Islam
Catalog Number: 1701 Enrollment: May only be taken for a letter grade. Not open to auditors.
M. Shahab Ahmed 
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 1-2:30, and an hour to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 15, 16
Provides students with knowledge of a broad range of key concepts, technical terms, seminal questions, and cultural motifs internal to the Islamic tradition. These constitute a vocabulary related to Quran and exegesis, Hadith, law, theology, political thought, philosophy, Sufism, ritual, literature, art, and architecture, that has permeated Islamic discourses, practices, and identities down to the modern period, and that is central to an informed understanding and further study of Islam as religion and civilizational complex.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3978.

Religion 1825 (formerly Religion 1590). Themes in Feminism and Islam: A Historical Overview
Catalog Number: 9891 Enrollment: Limited to 25.
Leila N. Ahmed (Divinity School) 
Half course (fall term). W., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
This course follows out the history of feminist themes and debates in Islam from their first emergence in the Middle East in the late 19th century to their ongoing development in America in the 21st century.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3604.

South Asian Studies

Urdu 101. Introductory Urdu-Hindi
Catalog Number: 4078
Richard S. Delacy and Naseem A. Hines 
Full course (indivisible). M. through Th., (F.), at 11; M. through Th., (F.), at 1. EXAM GROUP: 4, 13
An introduction to the lingua franca of the subcontinent in its “Hindustani” form. Students are introduced to both the Perso-Arabic and the Devanagari script systems. Conventional teaching materials are supplemented by popular songs and video clips from Bollywood.
Note: Not open to auditors.

Urdu 102. Intermediate Urdu-Hindi
Catalog Number: 2941
Richard S. Delacy 
Full course (indivisible). M., W., at 3, Th., at 9, and an additional hour to be arranged. . EXAM GROUP: 8, 11
Continuation of Urdu 101. Emphasis on written expression and texts in both Perso-Arabic and Devanagari script systems. Students are introduced to Urdu/Hindi fables, short stories, and various other genres of literature, including poetry.
Note: Not open to auditors.
Prerequisite: Urdu 101 or equivalent.

Urdu 103a. Advanced Urdu-Hindi
Catalog Number: 0700
Naseem A. Hines 
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 13
Continuation of Urdu 102; covers topics in advanced grammar; designed to improve proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.
Prerequisite: Urdu 102 or equivalent.

Urdu 104. The Classical Urdu Ghazal and Its Symbolism: Seminar
Catalog Number: 0927
Naseem A. Hines 
Half course (fall term). Tu., 5:30–7:30 p.m. EXAM GROUP: 18
A survey of the popular literary genre including selections from poets such as Wali Dakkani, Siraj Aurangabadi, Mir Dard, Haidar Ali Atish, Mirza Ghalib, and others. Special attention to religious and mystical symbolism.
Prerequisite: Urdu 102 or equivalent.

Urdu 105r. Topics in Urdu-Hindi Literature
Catalog Number: 5963
Ali S. Asani, Richard S. Delacy, and Naseem A. Hines 
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Individual reading course. A course for students with native or near-native proficiency with readings in a variety of genres from Urdu and/or Hindi literature based on student interest.

Harvard Divinity School

Courses that are crosslisted with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences are not included. Click here to see the full list of Islamic Studies courses at the Harvard Divinity School.

HDS 2108 Women, Justice, and Sharia in Nigeria
Hauwa Ibrahim
Half Course, Fall 2011, Mon., 12-2
Location to be announced.
This course will address the practical as well as theoretical challenges of protecting women’s rights under Shariah Law as it is practiced in Nigeria. The course will explore the tensions between Rule of Law and Rule of the Law in Shariah States; the question as to whether basic human rights, as defined by international standards, are protected. The outcomes of this course will be a ‘white paper’ by students on the dialectics of justice and Shariah.

HDS 3948 Readings in Christian-Muslim Relations
Jane I. Smith
Fall 2011, Tu., Thurs., 9-10am
We will read historical and contemporary source materials dealing with Christian-Muslim relations. Special attention will be given to the scriptural and historical realities that are the background of interfaith encounter; contemporary Christian and Muslim thinkers and theologians on changing interpretations of pluralism and views of the other; and Christian-Muslim encounters in various areas of the world today. Students should have a basic knowledge of Islam.

Harvard Law School

LAW-39875A Introduction to Islamic Law
Kristin Stilt
Fall 2011, Wed., Th., 1-2:30
This course is a broad introduction to Islamic law in historical and contemporary forms. We will first cover the origins and early development of Islamic law, with a focus on how the sources of Islamic law were used to derive a diverse body of rules and how those rules were implemented. Family law, criminal law, and commercial law will be the substantive focus in this first part and throughout the course. Secondly, and moving chronologically, we will cover the Ottoman legal system and then the phenomenon of codification of Islamic law in the 19-20th centuries, when Islamic law began in most areas of the Muslim world to be transformed and adapted into national codes. We will focus on family law in this section as a case study of codification. Third, we will discuss the “return” to Islamic criminal law seen in a few countries today. Finally, we will examine Islamic finance as another manifestation of Islamic law in the contemporary period.

Harvard Graduate School of Design: Aga Khan Program

History of Art and Architecture 124e. Architecture of the Early Modern Islamic Empires : Proseminar
Catalog Number: 26493 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Gülru Necipoglu-Kafadar 
Half course (fall term). Tu., 1–3.
Between the 16th and 18th centuries, three great empires ruled the Islamic lands from the Balkans to Bengal. The Mediterranean-based Ottomans, Safavids in Iran, and Mughals in India, developed visual cultures with distinctive architectural and ornamental idioms, originating from a shared Timurid heritage. The cities, monuments, and modes of ornament created in each empire are studied from aesthetic and contextual perspectives, with respect to religious orientations, imperial ideologies, and theories of dynastic legitimacy.

Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding 40. Monuments of Islamic Architecture
Catalog Number: 94499
Gülru Necipoglu-Kafadar (History of Art and Architecture) and David J. Roxburgh (History of Art and Architecture) 
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 13
An introduction to ten iconic monuments of the Islamic world from the beginning of Islam to the early modern period. The course introduces various types of building-mosques, palaces, multifunctional complexes-and city types and the factors that shaped them, artistic, patronal, socio-political, religio-cultural, and economic. Each case study is divided into two lectures. The first presents the monument or city by “walking” through it. The second is devoted to themes elicited from the example, developed in light of comparative monuments, sites, and/or written sources, and to problems of patronage, production, audience and meaning as they pertain to architectural history.
Note: Expected to be omitted in 2012–13. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engages substantially with Study of the Past. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Literature and Arts B.

Harvard Extension School

ANTH E-1615 The Anthropology of Arabia (13714)
Fall Term, Online Only
Steven Caton
This course focuses on the Arabian Peninsula in the twentieth century—Saudi Arabia, the Gulf States, Oman, and Yemen. It addresses tribal organization and its continuing importance, gender relations, varieties of Islam and their influence, and old and new forms of urbanism. Primary readings are all ethnographic. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences course Societies of the World 46. (4 credits)

RELI E-1550 Understanding Islam and Contemporary Muslim Societies (13807)
Ali Asani, Diane Moore
Fall Term, Tu., 7:35-9:35, 1 Story St. 304, Online option available
This course is an introductory survey of the fundamental concepts of Islam and the devotional practices of Muslims around the world, focusing on the diversity of Muslim religious worldviews and the manner in which they have been shaped by the political, social, and cultural contexts in which Muslims live, particularly in the modern period. (4 credits)

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