Film screening: “Enemy of the Reich: The Noor Inayat Khan Story”

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Event:
Film screening: “Enemy of the Reich: The Noor Inayat Khan Story”
Start:
October 22 2014 -- 6:00 pm
End:
October 22 2014 -- 8:00 pm
Cost:
Free, space is limited. Please RSVP to aisp@fas.harvard.edu
Category:
, , , , ,
Organizer:
Alwaleed Islamic Studies Program
Co-Organizers:
Center for Jewish Studies
Harvard Hillel
Harvard Islamic Society
Phone:
617-495-3379
aisp@fas.harvard.edu
Updated:
Venue:
CGIS South, Belfer Case Study Room 020
Address:
Google Map
1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge, 02138
Enemy of the Reich slider

Noor Inayat Khan‘s identity as a Muslim woman did not stop her from signing up to join the fight against the Nazis. Motivated by her faith, Noor’s worldview was based on a respect for all faiths against Hitler’s ideology of ethnic and religious extermination. She suffered the same fate as millions of Jews.

Scene from the film "Enemy of the Reich: The Noor Inayat Khan Story"

Scene from the film “Enemy of the Reich: The Noor Inayat Khan Story”

Noor was the daughter of a Muslim musician and Sufi teacher from India, Hazrat Inayat Khan, and his American wife Ora Ray Baker. After Noor’s birth in Moscow in 1914, the family moved to England and then to Paris, where she was raised.

In June, 1940, the Nazis invaded France. Noor fled to England, where she joined the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force and trained as a wireless operator in the ranks of Winston Churchill’s Special Operations Executive (SOE). Throughout the war, this organization secretly undermined the Axis powers in occupied Europe through espionage and covert disruption. In early 1943, Noor was dropped into France behind enemy lines as a secret agent and wireless operator. From Paris, she transmitted messages back to Britain, saving countless lives.

Noor Inayat Khan

Noor Inayat Khan

For a period she was the only link between the U.K. and the French Resistance. Pursued by the Gestapo, she was finally betrayed by French collaborators. The Nazis arrested and imprisoned her in Paris, where she resisted her captors, refused to name names, and twice attempted to escape. Too unruly for the Parisian authorities, she was shipped to a German prison and then to the infamous Dachau concentration camp. There she remained uncooperative and was finally killed in the last months of the war.

Opening remarks by Alex Kronemer.

Free and open to the public, but space is limited. Please RSVP to aisp@fas.harvard.edu.

Cosponsored with the Center for Jewish Studies, Harvard Hillel and the Harvard Islamic Society.

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