Courses Fall 2014: Harvard Divinity School

Al-Ghazali: Theologian and Mystic
HDS 3599
Khaled El-Rouayheb
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Thurs 3pm-5pm
Course location to be announced.
Al-Ghazali (d.1111) is generally recognized to be one of the most influential of all Muslim religious thinkers. A prominent theologian and jurist, he experienced a spiritual crisis at the height of his career, and as a consequence explored mysticism (Sufism) and worked out a powerful synthesis between respect for the externals of the Islamic religion and the mystics’ stress on the interior life. In this course, we will look in particular at his account of his spiritual crisis; his critical engagement with the Islamic Philosophers; and some of the more mystical works that he wrote toward the end of his life, including his theodicy, his meditations on the Qur’anic dictum that “God is the Light of the Heavens and the Earth”, and select chapters from his great summa “The Revival of the Religious Sciences”. All readings will be in English.
Enrollment Limited: No
Open to BTI Students: No
Jointly offered as Islamic Civilizations 146

History of Western Christianity, 150-1100
HDS 2230
Kevin James Madigan
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Tue Thu 10am-11:30am
Course location to be announced.
This course is designed to provide a historical overview of the Church and society in western Europe from the fourth through the twelfth century. Thus, this course will investigate late-antique and early medieval Christianity in its social and its cultural context. Narrative and theological story lines to be pursued will include the varieties of early Christianity; relations with the Roman state (including persecution of Christians by it); the emergence of normative or “early Catholic” Christianity; early and early medieval monasticism; the search for the Christian doctrine of God and Christ; early Christian architecture, piety and worship; Christianity and other world religions, especially Judaism and Islam; western and eastern Christianity; the emergence of the Roman primacy; the Christianization of the north of Europe; the nature of parochial Christianity; the emergence of the pope, in the eleventh century, as an international religious force; the crusades; and early medieval piety. We will also be strengthening our skills as interpreters of primary sources. Some attention will be paid to major historiographical issues.
Enrollment Limited: No
Open to BTI Students: Yes
Jointly offered as Religion 1434

History of the Middle East, 600-1055
HDS 3594
Roy Mottahedeh
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Tue Thu 1pm-2:30pm
Course location to be announced.
A survey of the history of the Near East and North Africa from the rise of Islam in the 7th century to the Turkish ascendance in the mid-11th century. Includes Muhammad and his community, Arab conquests, Umayyads and Abbasids, sectarian movements, minority communities, government and religious institutions, and relations with Byzantium and the Latin West.
Enrollment Limited: No
Open to BTI Students: No
Jointly offered as History 1877a

Introduction to Islamic Law
Baber Johansen
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Thurs 2pm-4pm
Course location to be announced.
This lecture course provides an oversight over the history of Muslim Law, the fiqh, from the 8th to the 19th century. This system of legal and ethical norms is conceived as the continuous interpretation of the shari’a, the revealed principles and norms of law and ethics. In the ‘branches of the fiqh‘ (furū‘ al-fiqh) this interpretation, since the eighth century, takes the form of the production of legal and ethical norms. From the tenth century on, the texts of the methodology of fiqh (uṣul al-fiqh) attempt to create the norms for norm production. We will discuss the norms and the methodology of the law as well as the institutions that allowed it to spread over the whole of the Muslim World. The course will consistently focus on the methods through which changes in genres of legal literature, methods, institutions and norms were introduced and recognized during different periods of the fiqh‘s development. Special attention will be given to the changes that the system underwent from the 19th to the 21st century.
Enrollment Limited: Limited to 30 students. Instructor’s permission required.
Open to BTI Students: Yes
Jointly offered as Islamic Civilizations 210

Islam, Modernity and Politics
HDS 3368
Ousmane Oumar Kane
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Fri 2pm-4pm
Course location to be announced.
The aim of this seminar is to study the evolution of Islamic thought and political practices in Muslim societies from the 19th to the early 21st centuries. Attention will be devoted to the patterns of interaction between the Muslim World and the West because it is our assumption that these patterns contribute to influence ideological formations and modes of religious/political mobilizations in the Muslim World. By the end of the eighteenth century, much of the Muslim World was in “decline” whereas European imperial powers, mainly France and Great Britain, were on the rise. The course will explore the response of Muslim societies and intellectuals to the rise of European prominence. The major 19th century reformist movements that appeared in the Muslim World will be discussed, ranging from movements advocating mild reform to those rejecting all influence of “Western civilization” and advocating a return to the Tradition of Muhammad. In the twentieth century, virtually all the Muslim World came under European colonial domination. During colonial rule and after, the Muslim world experienced major transformations which affected the nature and administration of law, politics and society. It is in this context, that the new Islamic revival that some have called “Islamism” was articulated as an alternative to Westernization. The course will address the rise of contemporary “Islamism,” as an alternative to Western domination and modernization/Westernization. The major theorists of political Islam as well as the different trajectories of “Islamism” in diverse Muslim societies will be covered. The impact of political Islam in the West will also be addressed. The final part of the course will assess the trajectories of political Islam and address the ongoing debates on post-Islamism, secularism and modernity.
Enrollment Limited: Limited to 18 students. Instructor’s permission required.
Open to BTI Students: Yes
Jointly offered as Islamic Civilizations 170

Islamic Modernism 1 (1700-1800)
HDS 3963
Baber Johansen
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Tues 4pm-6pm
Course location to be announced.
This is the first of three courses on the development of Islamic Modernism from the 18th to the 21st century. All three seminars focus on a notion of “Modernism” and “Modernity” that is not simply imported into the Middle East. We will, therefore, have to discuss concepts of “Modernity” that see modernity produced in Europe or the US and then imported into the Middle East in order to show their shortcomings. We will also have to look closely at discussions within the field of Islamic Studies that deny or defend the existence of an Islamic modernism before the second half of the 19th century. The underlying assumption of the course organization is that Islamic Modernism cannot be understood when it is cut off from the intellectual and religious history of the centuries preceding it. The first of these three courses will therefore focus on the 18th-century religious reform movements: the Muwaḥḥidun in the Arabian Peninsula, the Sufi thinkers in Morocco, Sudan, Libya and Upper Egypt. These movements challenged dominant forms of scholastic thought, legal reasoning, and historical consciousness, as well as the barriers built by them that denied non-theologians and non-jurists the right to interpret revelation and Islamic normativity.
Enrollment Limited: Limited to 12 students. Instructor’s permission required.
Open to BTI Students: Yes
Jointly offered as Islamic Civilizations 230

Lived Religion in South Asia
HDS 3461
Anne E. Monius
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Mon Wed 10am-11am
Course location to be announced.
This course explores the lives, practices, and experiences of contemporary South Asians from Hindu, Muslim, Jain, and Sikh perspectives. Concepts central to South Asian worldviews will be carefully considered in the context of both rural and urban day-to-day activities, rituals, and family life. Readings are drawn from a wide range of ethnographic literature, and films documenting a diverse range of religious, cultural, and social settings from across South Asia will frequently be shown. Note: Course has additional hour to be arranged.
Enrollment Limited: No
Open to BTI Students: Yes
Jointly offered as Religion 1602

Muslim Societies in South Asia: Religion, Culture, and Identity
HDS 3625
Ali S. Asani
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Thurs 1pm-3pm
Course location to be announced.
South Asia (India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh) is home to the largest concentration of Muslims in the world. This course introduces students to a variety of issues that have characterized the development and evolution of South Asian Muslim communities. While the course will briefly survey the historical development of Islamic and Muslim institutions in the region, its central focus will be the formation of identity—as expressed through language, literature, and the arts—among South Asian Muslim communities. The issues that influence these identities will be considered with regard to the constantly evolving religious and political contexts of South Asia. Special attention will be given to recent attempts to redefine Muslim religious identities through reform and revivalist movements as well as state policies of Islamization. We will look at the impact of these policies on issues such as the status of Muslim women, relations between Muslim and non-Muslims and the growth of sectarian tensions between Muslim groups. The course is appropriate for those who wish to acquire a bird’s-eye view of the Islamic tradition in South Asia, as well as those interested in exploring some of the issues confronting Muslim populations in contemporary times.
Enrollment Limited: No
Open to BTI Students: No
Jointly offered as Islamic Civilizations 178

Religion, Gender, Identity – Readings in 20th Century ‘Arab’ Memoirs – Muslim, Christian, and Jewish
HDS 3616
Leila Ahmed
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Thurs 2pm-4pm
Course location to be announced.
We will read autobiographical works by mainly 20th century ‘Arab’ writers, Muslim, Christian and Jewish, paying particular attention to issues of religion, gender and identity, exploring how these are at play in the texts and in authorial constructions of self, history, and meaning.
Enrollment Limited: Limited to 12 students. Instructor’s permission required.
Open to BTI Students: Yes
Jointly offered as Religion 1842

Readings in Islam and the History of Islam in the U.S. and Europe
HDS 3582
Leila Ahmed
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Wed 1pm-4pm
Course location to be announced.
We will read contemporary works in the history of Islam in the U.S. and Europe in the 20th and 21st centuries.
Enrollment Limited: Limited to 25 students. Instructor’s permission required.
Open to BTI Students: Yes
Jointly offered as Religion 1829

Religion and Political Violence in North Africa and the Sahel
HDS 3371
Ousmane Oumar Kane
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Wed 2pm-4pm
Course location to be announced.
Unknown in Africa before the jihad against the Soviet Occupation of Afghanistan, suicide bombing has become common place in the 21st century. From Algeria to Somalia through Libya, Mali and Nigeria, so- called Salafi jihadis have recruited and trained tens of thousands of combatants. Through cigarette and narcotic trafficking, hostage taking for ransom, and bank hold ups, they have procured huge financial resources, sophisticated weapons, and now constitute a serious security challenge not only to many countries of North Africa and the Sahel but also to their Western allies. This conference course will address the spread of jihadi groups in Muslim Africa (North Africa and the Sahel) after the cold war. The first part of the course will adress the divergent theoretical interpretations of terrorism and address in particular the following questions: Is it greed that sustains civil wars or grievance? Does the root of terror lie in culture or politics? Is there any evidence that civilizations clashed after the cold war? The second part of the course will focus on select transnational Islamist movements, situated both in their local context of nation building and their larger regional contexts. Case studies will include Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb in North Africa and the Sahel, the Harakat al-shabab al-mujahidin in the Horn of Africa, the Boko Haram in the Lake Chad region and the Gama’at islamiyya in Egypt and beyond.
Enrollment Limited: Limited to 18 students. Instructor’s permission required.
Open to BTI Students: Yes
Jointly offered as Islamic Civilizations 171

Religious Communities in Contemporary Iran
HDS 3374
Houchang Chehabi
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Mon 12pm-2pm
Course location to be announced.
Officially, Iran is an Islamic Republic that recognizes three religious minorities: Zoroastrians, Jews, and Christians. But there are other communities, such as Baha’is and Yaresan, not to mention a by now significant number of converts to Christianity. Moreover, within the Muslim community there is some variety, most importantly represented by Iran’s growing Sunni population. This course introduces students to the religious diversity of contemporary Iran. The format of the course is reading and discussion, interspersed with lectures of varying length by the instructor. The first few sessions will dwell on Twelver Shiites, followers of the country’s official state religion, after which the various communities will be studied.
Enrollment Limited: No
Open to BTI Students: Yes

Science, Religion, and Sex: Bodies and Sexualities in the Medieval Middle East
HDS 3587
Ahmed Ragab
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Mon Wed 11am-12pm
Course location to be announced.
The body has been always an object of imagination, literature, science, philosophy and religion. It is the object of health and disease, birth and death, reward and punishment, science, philosophy and religion, and is the vehicle of both the divine and the profane. It is at the center of debates on sexuality, gender identities, race and politics. In this course, we will look at how scientific and religious views on the body and on sexuality developed and changed in the Middle East throughout the medieval period and early modern period and how they influenced and were influenced by the religious doctrines, the medical theories, the Islamic law and the intellectual environment of the Islamic Middle Ages. The course will address these different views and perceptions as manifested in the religious, philosophical, legal, scientific and literary production of the period. Note: Consult instructor for art of ministry requirement. Course has additional hour to be arranged.
Enrollment Limited: No
Open to BTI Students: Yes
Jointly offered as History of Science 108

Talibanization
HDS 3023
Anila Daulatzai
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Mon 2pm-4pm
Course location to be announced.
The term Talibanization has come to be widely used to refer to religious conservatism and/or religious extremism, particularly (but not exclusively) as related to Islam, and particularly as oppressive towards women. This course will take a closer look at the emergence of “Talibanization,” and at the various ways in which the term and others like it are deployed by a wide range of state and non-state actors to describe groups as diverse as advocates of Sharia law in Nigeria, Tea Party members in the U.S., and Hindu nationalists in India.
Enrollment Limited: Limited to 15 students. Instructor’s permission required.
Open to BTI Students: Yes

Upper-Level Classical Arabic I
HDS 4353
Dalia Abo-Haggar
0.50 credits
Fall 2014
Mon Tues Thurs 9am-10am
Course location to be announced.
Concentration on readings from classical Islamic texts, with emphasis on Qur’an, hadîth, sîra, and tafsîr literature; directed readings and textual analysis; review of classical Arabic morphology and syntax. Note: Not open to auditors. Prerequisite: HDS 4351 or equivalent, or may be taken separately with permission of the instructor.
Enrollment Limited: No
Open to BTI Students: No
Jointly offered as Arabic 130a

porno, redtube